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Delhi

Delhi is a lively city reflecting a perfect blend of modernization and traditional architectures. Being the capital city of the Republic India, Delhi is the center of Government's legislature and judiciary system. The city reflects two sides of the same coin i.e. Old Delhi and New Delhi. Set on both sides of River Yamuna, Delhi is seen as one of the fastest growing cities in India. New Delhi is a reflection of modern India with having VVIPs buildings, legislative homes and diplomat zones whereas Old Delhi gives an incredible picture of traditional and historical values of India.

Delhi has many historical monuments like – Qutab Minar (the world's tallest brick minaret), Humayun Tomb, Old Fort (Purana Qila), Jama Masjid, Jantar Mantar, Red Fort, Tuglaqabad Fort, Lotus Temple (also known as Bahai Temple) and Rashtrapati Bhavan. For the shopping and movie freaks, the city has a number of markets, malls and entertainment complexes. Connaught Place, Lajpat Nagar, South Extension, Sarojani Nagar, Hauz Khas, GK-II and Chandni Chowke are some of the best places for shopping, especially for women. Khari Baoli Market near Chandni Chowke is seen as Asia's largest wholesale spice market.

Delhi has a mixed culture as people of all communities and religions live here. However, English, Hindi, Urdu and Punjabi are the key languages spoken in the city.

 

Sights in Delhi:

 

 

The Red Fort: A 17th century fort complex, constructed in the walled city of Old Delhi, it dates from the very peak of Mughal Power. Built by the Mughal Emperor, Shahjahan in 1648, it is a grandiose of pomp and power. Designated as the UNESCO World heritage site, the planning and aesthetics of this Fort represent the zenith of Mughal creativity which prevailed during the reign of Emperor Shah Jahan.

 

The Qutub Minar: A fine example of early Afghan architecture, its construction started immediately after the defeat of the last Hindu kingdom in Delhi in 1193 as a symbol of victory. It is surrounded by several other ancient and medieval structures and ruins, collectively known as the Qutub complex.

 

The Humayun's Tomb: Declared as UNESCO world heritage site, it was commissioned in 1562 AD by the Mughal Ruler, Humayun's grieving widow. It was the first mature example of Mughal architecture and the first structure to use red sand tone at such a scale.

 

The India Gate: The India Gate is the national monument of India. Situated in the heart of New Delhi, the India Gate was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, inspired by the Arc de Triomphe in Paris. It was built in 1931. Originally known as the All India War Memorial, it is a prominent landmark in Delhi and commemorates the 90,000 soldiers of the Indian Army who lost their lives while fighting for the Indian Empire, or more correctly the British Raj, in World War I and the Third Anglo-Afghan War.

 

The Lotus Temple: The Bahá'í House of Worship in New Delhi is popularly known as the Lotus Temple due to its flower-like shape. It was completed in 1986 and serves as the Mother Temple of the Indian subcontinent. It has won numerous architectural awards and has been featured in hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles.


The Akshardham Temple: Also referred to as Delhi Akshardham or Swaminarayan Akshardham, the complex displays millennia of traditional Indian and Hindu culture, spirituality, and architecture. The temple, which attracts approximately 70 percent of all tourists who visit Delhi is designed in accordance with ancient Vedic text known as the Sthapatya Shastra and is a blend of architectural styles from across India.

 

 

More information about Delhi can be found here ((c) Alpcord).

 

 

 

Ganga River

 

The Ganga is a trans-boundary river of Asia which flows through the nations of India and Bangladesh. The 2,525 km (1,569 mi) river rises in the western Himalayas in the Indian state of Uttarakhand, and flows south and east through the Gangetic Plain of North India into Bangladesh, where it empties into the Bay of Bengal. It is the third largest river in the world by discharge, and the 34th longest. The Ganges is the most sacred river to Hindus. It is also a lifeline to millions of Indians who live along its course and depend on it for their daily needs.

It is worshipped as the goddess Ganga in Hinduism. It has also been important historically, with many former provincial or imperial capitals (such as Pataliputra, Kannauj, Kara, Kashi, Patna, Hajipur, Munger, Bhagalpur, Murshidabad, Baharampur, Kampilya, and Kolkata) located on its banks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright © 2012 Bernhard Schober
Copyright © 2012 Bernhard Schober


 

(c) 2017 World's Large Rivers Conferences
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